forms API

Overriding Themeable Functions: The Where's, the Why's, and the How's

There's good news and bad news. First, the good news: overriding theme functions is easy. The bad news: every theme function is different, and there isn't a standard proceedure of going about it; if you don't know what you are doing, its quite easy to accidently do something ugly, or foolish.

So, in the next few tutorials, we are going to explore the hows, whys, why nots, and what ifs of overriding theme functions. Each of these functions will present a different set of challenges, and opprotunities to do something stupid, etc. Today's lesson is "Building a better node form". In this tutorial you will learn

An Introduction: Dominating the User Login Form

In this first tutorial, you will learn how to:

  1. override the default presentation of the user login form, and create a custom template for it.
  2. pass an editable node into the user login form
  3. alter the form’s values (such as text, and instructions)
  4. make the form available to page.tpl.php — as though it was something as simple as a footer.

Moreover, I will show you how bloody simple it is. Folks who follow this tutorial should already have:

  1. knowledge of PHP
  2. the ability to lie about a lack of knowledge of PHP
  3. some familiarity of the kindergarden basics of drupal theming
  4. Be working with drupal 4.7+

Step One: Override the deafult user login form

Overriding is always done in the theme’s template.php file (if you don’t have a template.php file, you may create a it now). Obviously, before you can override anything, you must first locate what you are trying to override. The best way to do this is to search a module for the $form variable.

A Brief Overview of the Future of Drupal: Short Term and Long Term

Last summer, nearly every client that I talked with who wanted a CMS would ask for Mambo. This was in spite of Drupal's obvious superiority in terms of code, flexibility, and power.

I was forced to conclude that Drupal's biggest weakness was the first impression it was making. I spent about 2 minutes looking at, and Mambo's homepage, and the cause of Drupal's weak first impression was dead obvious:

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